Our Mission

Welcome to the official website of the Mount Vernon Cultural District! We are a 501 (c)(3) non-profit organization whose mission is to support and promote the cultural institutions in the Mount Vernon Neighborhood of Baltimore, Maryland.

227 Steps

August/September, 2015
Volume 3, Issue 7

Dear Reader,

Monumental Bicentennial
Thousands of people celebrated the Washington Monument’s reopening at the July 4 Monumental Bicentennial, courtesy Mount Vernon Place Conservancy

Ask any Baltimorean for their thoughts about the Washington Monument, and you’ll likely receive a nostalgic response: Many have childhood memories of racing up the 227 narrow steps to the monument’s top, and the breathtaking city views that rewarded them.

With Baltimore’s recent building boom, the skyline has changed since the Monument was last open to the public, which makes a compelling reason for another visit. But the brand-new exhibit displays and beautifully preserved interior spaces are also showstoppers in themselves — and they’re worth a closer look.

Deciphering 19th Century Shorthand

MVPC Gallery
The restored interior gallery,
courtesy Mount Vernon Place Conservancy

“In the interior gallery, behind the finished plaster are rough, 4-feet stone walls” says Lance Humphries, PhD, Mount Vernon Place Conservancy. “Many people may remember that these walls and the ceiling used to be a dark, battleship grey.

The walls of the interior gallery were originally made in a building technique referred to as “stuccoed in imitation of stone.”

But what exactlywas that?

An analysis of the building finishes revealed that original building material used on the walls was actually porous.  After it was installed in the late 1830s it quickly sustained much water damage and was eventually replaced. During the restoration, the team at Hayles & Howe went back to what was most likely the original wall finish, a natural cement.

It was a common practice during the early 19th Century to create faux finishes which gave a space the impression that it was more opulent than it actually was. Joint lines were cut into the plaster, giving the effect of massive block walls.

The resulting feel is quite spacious, and much different from the dank and dreary space of your memory.

New lighting inside the gallery serves to highlight these beautiful architectural features, as well.

Secrets of the “Bronzed Green” Fence

car accident
The aftermath of the 2012 accident,
courtesy Baltimore Sun

The Washington Monument has been witness to several car accidents in recent years; In 2012, a driver of a car had fallen asleep at the wheel, overturning the car in Mount Vernon Square. The driver was unharmed. In 2010, the driver of a van barrelled directly into the iron fence encircling the Monument. This driver, who fled the scene and was never found, had destroyed fifteen feet of fencing.

The Savage Manufacturing Company cast the fence originally in 1838. G. Krug & Son, a Baltimore blacksmith since 1810, repaired the fence after the 2010 crash and was instrumental in the complete restoration in 2014-15.

Just like the interior walls, the iron fence was made to look more elaborate than it actually was. The fence, designed by Robert Mills, was painted to resemble weathered bronze.

“This color blends in with the letters on the base of the monument, which were actually cast in bronze,” says Humphries.

ax drawing
A drawing of the ax finials by Robert Mills found on an envelope, 1838, Maryland Historical Society, MS-876

The color of the fence was referred to as “bronze green.” A paint analyst delved down over 20 coats to find the original finish. Seeing the original, 200-year old color through the lens of a microscope was an exciting discovery in itself.

The gate posts of the railing are topped by ax finials. These are beautiful emblems of American military prowess. Interestingly, even these items have a backstory. According to Humphries, when the fence was first cast, eagles were produced and installed to ornament the fence. They somehow were unsatisfactory, and Mills was called upon to come up with a new design, selecting the ax and submitting a new design.

Sights Previously Unseen

George Washington
A bird’s eye-view of America’s First President, courtesy Mount Vernon Place Conservancy

Interactive touch screens in the interior gallery allow visitors to explore the Monument, giving them access to areas they wouldn’t see previously, such as a personal vista of the George Washington statue at top.

“Washington was sculpted to be seen from 200 feet away,” says Humphries, “No one was going to see him up close but the birds.”

In addition, the two time capsules, which had been sitting within the Monument’s walls for 100 and 200 years, respectively, are now on display at the Maryland Historical Society.

The 1815 time capsule contained a copy of the Declaration of Independence, reprinted in the Federal Gazette on July 3, 1815, the day before the cornerstone was laid.

“The fact that the builders added a copy of the Declaration of Independence to the 1815 time capsule before they sealed it is very telling” Humphries says. “They didn’t just create this monument in tribute to George Washington; they made it as a monument to American independence.”

Steps
The restored spiral staircase,
courtesy Mount Vernon Place Conservancy

The interactive displays also contain live video streams of the North, South, East and West views from the Monument’s pinnacle.

But if you’d like to see them for yourself, you are more than welcome to!

The227 steps to the Monument’s top are once again open to the public. They spiral up through 9 rotations. All new lighting has been installed to try to recreate the original feeling of ascending the stairs –which, according to Humphries, was originally done with a lantern!

And the view at the top is worth the climb, even in August. It’s a cherished vantage point for our Mount Vernon neighborhood, and one we’re thrilled to see again.

“People from Baltimore, who were born here, who have lived here, they’re incredibly proud of the monument,” says Humphries. “It’s beautiful to see the pride they’re showing in posts on our Mount Vernon Place Conservancy Facebook page. We at the Mount Vernon Conservancy believe that restoring the monument really is our way of giving back to Baltimore,” he add, “It’s our goal to get people back to Mount Vernon Place and see this first-hand.”

Naturalization ceremony
At the Monumental Bicentennial’s Naturalization Ceremony, 39 people became U.S. citizens. Image courtesy Mount Vernon Place Conservancy

The monument is more than a historical icon; it’s a living and celebrated gathering place for our city, as demonstrated by the thousands of people who came to the Monumental Bicentennial celebration on July 4.

The Washington Monument is open Thursday 4 pm-9 pm and Friday-Sunday noon- 5 pm. The interior gallery and exhibits are free. Admission to climb the steps is $5 and reservations may be made following the instructions on the “Visit” tab of the Conservancy’s website.  The Conservancy is launching an online ticketing system in the coming weeks; check their website for updates.


 

Upcoming Events In Mount Vernon
Presented in Alphabetical Order

 

Baltimore School For the Arts
712 Cathedral Street | 443-642-5167 | Website

Board-close up
Second Chance, by Sarah VanDerBeek

Photography Exhibit:
The Movement of Memory

Sep 18, 2015 – Oct 14, 2015

BSA’s Visual artists are kicking off the year’s events with an exhibit of the work they’ll create with BSA alumna Sara VanDerBeek. A critically acclaimed artist, Sara is currently featured in the Front Room at the Baltimore Museum of Art. She and BSA’s seniors will consider the impact of performance, process, and site on contemporary photography. Join them at the Opening Reception Friday, September 18, from 4-6 pm. Free! The exhibit runs through October 14, 2015. Visit the Baltimore School for the Arts website for more information.

Labor of Love
Sep 26, 2015 | 9 AM-2 PM

BSA’s annual clean-up, fix-up, team-up fun-day is back on schedule for the fall – The school welcomes volunteers! Save the date Saturday, September 26 from 9 am to 2 pm to help us beautify BSA. All welcome and encouraged! Contact Carter Polakoff at cpolakoff@bsfa.org for more information!


 

 

Baltimore Symphony Orchestra
1212 Cathedral Street | 410-783-8000 | Website

 

Lang Lang

Gala Celebration with Lang Lang
Sat, Sep 12, 2015  |  8:30 PM
The Meyerhoff

Christopher Seaman, conductor
Lang Lang, piano

Elgar: Pomp and Circumstance March No. 4
Dukas: The Sorcerer’s Apprentice
Rachmaninoff: Piano Concerto No. 2

His virtuosity at the Olympics was experienced by over one billion worldwide. “Technical fireworks,” raves the San Francisco Examiner of Lang Lang. For one performance only with the BSO, Lang Lang plays Rachmaninoff’s ravishing Second Piano Concerto.

Tickets range from $75 to $100 and are available through the BSO Ticket Office at 410.783.8000 or BSOmusic.org.

Dawes

BSO Pulse: Dawes
Thu, Sep 24, 2015  |  7 PM
The Meyerhoff

Philip Glass: Symphony No. 3

Doors open at 5 PM
Lobby bands at 7 PM
Concert to follow

Expand your musical horizons with Pulse, a new concert series that brings together the classical world and the indie rock scene on one stage. Each concert will explore connections that cross genres, opening with members of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, followed by a performance featuring the headliner and culminating with a unique collaboration. Start the evening off with food from some of the area’s best restaurants, happy hour specials, local vendors and live pre-concert entertainment!

Pulse is made possible by a generous grant from The Wallace Foundation.

Tickets are $35 and are available through the BSO Ticket Office at 410.783.8000 or BSOmusic.org.


 

 

Center Stage
700 North Calvert Street | 410-332-0033 | Website

 

Pride and Prejudice

A World Premiere Production of Jane Austen’s
Pride and Prejudice

Sep 11 – Oct 11
The Meyerhoff

Adapted by Christopher Baker

“As fresh and relevant as the day it was written.” – The Independent (UK)

Jane Austen’s mastery of manners and morals will be on full display in Center Stage’s new production of her beloved masterpiece, Pride and Prejudice. In the Bennet sisters’ 19th-century English world, marriage is the prize, but for second-eldest, Lizzy, companionship trumps blind courtship. Enter Mr. Darcy, and one of literature’s most iconic and tempestuous romances takes flight. Journey through a world quite unlike-and yet perhaps not so different from-our own, as Lizzy and Darcy learn that first impressions aren’t all they seem, and that second chances can lead to answers that have been there the entire time.

Tickets range from $19 to $39 and are available by clicking here.

Audience members get a sneak peek at the final rehearsals of the play for a discounted ticket price from a post-opening night performance.

Night Out LGBTQ Pre-show Reception: Tuesday, September 15
A pre-show reception that welcomes the LGBTQ community to mingle before a Preview performance with complimentary wine and appetizers from Gertrude’s Restaurant.

Opening Night: Friday, September 18
Guests and ticket-buyers are invited to special Opening Night activities and an after-party with heavy hors d’oeuvres by sponsor Classic Catering and beer from sponsor Union Brewery.

Meet the Actors: Friday, September 25
We provide a casual atmosphere to chat with the cast after the show. Ask them your questions and get some autographs!


 

 

Enoch Pratt Free Library
400 Cathedral Street | 410-396-5430 | Website

 

Writers LIVE: Amy Stewart, Girl Waits With Gun
Tuesday, September 15, 2015  |  7 PM

Amy Stewart

This debut novel from the author of The Drunken Botanist is based on the forgotten true story of one of the nation’s first female deputy sheriffs.

Constance Kopp doesn’t quite fit the mold. She towers over most men, has no interest in marriage or domestic affairs, and has been isolated from the world since a family secret sent her and her sisters into hiding fifteen years ago.

One day a belligerent and powerful silk factory owner runs down their buggy, and a dispute over damages turns into a war of bricks, bullets, and threats as he unleashes his gang on their family farm. When the sheriff enlists her help in convicting the men, Constance is forced to confront her past and defend her family – and she does it in a way that few women of 1914 would have dared.

Amy Stewart has written six nonfiction books on the perils and pleasures of the natural world, including four New York Times bestsellers: The Drunken Botanist,Wicked Bugs, Wicked Plants and Flower Confidential. She is the recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts fellowship, the American Horticulture Society’s Book Award, and an International Association of Culinary Professionals Food Writing Award.

The Ivy Bookshop will have copies of the author’s books for sale at a book signing following the program.

Location: Central Library, Wheeler Auditorium 400 Cathedral Street, Baltimore, MD 21201

Writers LIVE: Dale Russakoff, The Prize:
Who’s in Charge of America’s Schools?

Thursday, September 17, 2015  |  6:30 PM

Dale Russakoff

When Mark Zuckerberg announced his $100 million pledge to transform the Newark Schools – and to solve the education crisis in every city in America – it looked like a huge win for then-mayor Cory Booker and governor Chris Christie. But their plans soon ran into a constituency not so easily moved: Newark’s key education players, fiercely protective of their billion-dollar-per-annum system. It’s a prize that, for generations, has enriched seemingly everyone, except Newark’s students.

Journalist Dale Russakoff delivers a story of high ideals and hubris, good intentions and greed, celebrity and street smarts, as reformers face off against entrenched unions, skeptical parents and bewildered students. The growth of charters forces the hand of Newark’s school superintendent Cami Anderson who closes, consolidates, or redesigns more than a third of the city’s schools.

The Prize is a portrait of a titanic struggle over the future of education for the poorest kids, and a cautionary tale for those who care about the shape of America’s schools.

Dale Russakoff spent 28 years as a reporter for the Washington Post, covering politics, education, social policy and other topics.

Location: Central Library, Poe Room 400 Cathedral Street, Baltimore, MD 21201

Writers LIVE: Dr. Freeman A. Hrabowski III
Holding Fast to Dreams: Empowering Youth
from the Civil Rights Crusade to STEM Achievement

Thursday, September 24, 2015  |  7 PM

Freeman Hrabowski

When he was 12 years old, Freeman Hrabowski heard Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. talk about a children’s march for civil rights and opportunity. Hrabowski convinced his parents to let him participate in the famed Children’s Crusade. He spent five terrifying nights in jail and became a leader for the younger kids.

Dr. Hrabowski went on to fuse his passion for education and for equality. As president of the University of Maryland Baltimore County, he founded the Meyerhoff Scholars Program, which has been one of the most successful programs for educating African Americans who go on to earn doctorates in the STEM disciplines. In Holding Fast to Dreams, Hrabowski recounts his journey as an educator, a university president, and a pioneer in developing successful, holistic programs for high-achieving students of all races.

Location: Central Library, Main Hall, 1st floor 400 Cathedral Street, Baltimore, MD 21201

Writers LIVE programs are supported in part by a generous grant from PNC Bank.


 

 

Maryland Historical Society
201 W. Monument Street | Phone 410-685-3750 | Website

 

The Jewels of the Duchess of Windsor
Thursday, September 10, 2015  |  6 PM

Presented by Carol Elkins, G.G., Senior Vice President,
Sotheby’s Jewels

Flamingo
Lot 20
The Ruby, Sapphire, Emerald, Citrine And Diamond Flamingo Clip, Mounted By Cartier, Paris, 1940
Estimate: £1,000,000-1,500,000
Sold for £1,721,250 ($2,678,954)
Image courtesy Sotheby’s

Twenty-four years after Sotheby’s legendary auction, the Jewels of the Duchess of Windsor continue to capture our imaginations. Once worn by a woman who was a leader of fashion and the epitome of elegance and sophistication for her generation and beyond, the collection is comprised examples from the great French Maisons, such as Cartier and Van Cleef & Arpels, and also included jewels by “cutting edge” designers of the day such as Suzanne Belperron, Fulco di Verdura and David Webb.  The personal inscriptions on some of the jewels tell the tale of what was perhaps the greatest love story of the 20th century, the romance that led Edward VII to abdicate the throne of Great Britain for the woman he loved.

Carol Elkins is a Senior Vice President and Senior Specialist in Sotheby’s New York Jewelry Department with an emphasis on Antique and Period Jewels. Her responsibilities include organizing and promoting jewelry auctions in New York, meeting with clients to provide auction estimates, estate and fair market appraisals, researching 19th and 20th century historical jewels, working with department specialist trainees, and serving as guest lecturer to special groups. Ms. Elkins joined Sotheby’s in 1986.

The lecture begins at 6:30 PM, and there will be an open bar and heavy hors d’oeuvres. To register, click here.


 

 

The Maryland Humanities Council
108 West Centre Street |  410-685-0095 | Website

 

MDHumCouncil

Greater Baltimore Area Event Calendar: September

Book discussions and other interactive programming around this year’s bestselling One Maryland One Book, The Boys in the Boatby Daniel James Brown, take place throughout the city in September at Enoch Pratt Free Library branches.  Visit the MHC online calendar at www.mdhc.org to find one near you!

The MHC-funded traveling exhibit “Early Women of Architecture in Maryland” opens at the AIA Baltimore Gallery on September 1. The exhibit showcases the stories and Maryland projects of pioneering women in the architectural profession. Learn more here.

On September 11, the Rosenwald documentary film, partially funded through a major grant by MHC, opens at the Charles Theater in Baltimore. Rosenwald, by Aviva Kempner, tells the life story of Chicago philanthropist Julius Rosenwald, the son of an immigrant peddler who rose to head Sears, partnered with Booker T. Washington to build 5,400 Southern schools in African-American communities in the early 1900s during the Jim Crow era. Rosenwald also built YMCAs and housing for African Americans to address the pressing needs of the Great Migration. The Rosenwald Fund supported great artists like Marian Anderson, Woody Guthrie, Langston Hughes, Gordon Parks, and Jacob Lawrence. Among those interviewed are civil rights leaders Julian Bond, Ben Jealous and Congressman John Lewis, columnists Eugene Robinson and Clarence Page, Cokie Roberts, Rabbi David Saperstein, Rosenwald school alumni writer Maya Angelou and director George C. Wolfe and Rosenwald relatives. Learn more and watch the trailer.

On September 19, join the Maryland Humanities Council for our Literary Walking Tour of Mount Vernon, offered every third Saturday in April through October! This guided 90-minute walking tour takes you past Mount Vernon’s elegant mansions and majestic cultural institutions and into the minds of Baltimore’s literary luminaries. Follow in the footsteps of the many famous authors, poets, and editors who sojourned in Baltimore’s cultural hub. Registration is required for this tour: register here.


 

 

Peabody Institute
1 East Mount Vernon Place | Phone: 410-234-4500 | Website

 

Hajime Teri Murai

Peabody Symphony Orchestra
Season Opener

September 26, 8 PM

Music Director: Hajime Teri Murai

Hajime Teri Murai leads the PSO in the first Peabody concert of the season, performing Beethoven’s 3rd Symphony and Selected Songs by Richard Strauss featuring Sylvia L. Green Voice Competition Winner Alexandra Razskazoff, soprano.

Tickets: $15 Adults, $10 Seniors, $5 Students. Click here or call 410-234-4800 for more information.

Location: Miriam A. Friedberg Concert Hall, 17 E Mt Vernon Place, Baltimore, Peabody Institute

The Peabody Trio
September 29, 8 PM

Peabody’s resident faculty ensemble performs a program of works by Schnittke, Loevendie, and Beethoven to open the 2015-16 Sylvia Adalman Chamber Series.

Tickets: $15 Adults, $10 Seniors, $5 Students. Click here or call 410-234-4800 for more information.

Location: Leith Symington Griswold Hall, 17 E Mt Vernon Place, Baltimore, Peabody Institute


 

 

Spotlighters Theatre
817 Saint Paul Street | Phone: 410-752-1225 | Website

 

A SENSATION NOVEL

A SENSATION NOVEL
Sept 11 – Oct 4, 2015

Book:  W.S. Gilbert
Music:  Michael Nash, T German Reed
direction:  Michael Blum
musical direction: Erica Rome & Michael Blum

Synopsis: W. S. Gilbert, long before he worked with Arthur Sullivan, was Victorian England’s leading dramatist. In this hilarious topsy-turvy send-up of Victorian “Sensation Novels” (a genre still with us today as Romance Fiction), Gilbert gives us 5 “stock characters” who refuse to conform to society’s expectations or the novel’s author’s plans for them – they turn the story upside down, break all the conventions of the stage, and indulge in some VERY modern activities. This musical play, with a new score by British composer Michael Nash that incorporates some of the original (mostly lost) music, is both outrageous, touching and funny – a window into an 1871 that was FAR from stodgy and predictable!

Tickets: Adults $20; Seniors (60+) $18; Students &Military $16.
Ten Spot Thursday – ALL TICKETS JUST $10:  Sept 17, 2015 at 8 PM (no other discounts apply)

Talk Back with Cast & Director: Sept 27, 2015 immediately following the performance.

Performance Dates: Sept 11, 12, 13; 17, 18, 19, 20; 25, 26, 27; Oct  2, 3, 4.

Purchase tickets by clicking here.

AFTER-SCHOOL ACADEMY
Fall 2015

(Programs begin late Sept, and run through week of Nov 16)

Collage

Below are a few of the classes we are offering this semester:

If you are interested – please complete this online survey so that we can schedule the classes you want – when you want them.        We will use information from the Survey Responses to schedule which classes are held, depending on response and on which days of the week, each class is held.

K-3rd grades: Actors Tool Box I
An introduction to acting and theatre.  Focusing on the basic skills and concepts needed to present fully developed characters and telling the story of the play. Students learn about developing characters and the components of a play, using creative drama work to devise their own work.  Students work in the areas of Improv Acting, Movement & Physical Acting, Voice & Projection. (6-8 weeks)

4th-8th grades: Actors Tool Box II
An introduction to acting and theatre.  Taking the next step for students with limited theatre experience to students with classroom training, this program focuses on the needs of each student to help them improve their skill level and tackle more difficult work on stage.  Students work with local theatre professionals to gain a better understanding of character development and stagework.  (6-8 weeks)

6-8th grades: Shakespeare for the Middle School Actor
Tackling the major works of William Shakespeare to provide a general understanding of the work and its characters, this class provides students a wide range of knowledge of the writings of Shakespeare and some of his best known works.  Students will read each work and discuss the various plots, while developing a character study on a single character and preparing a scene from the work.  (8-10 weeks)

6th – 8th grades: Intro to Dance for the Middle School Actor
Focusing on primary dance forms for Musical Theatre, this workshop will prepare the non-dancer for basic work in most Musical Theatre productions, and improve confidence in the audition process.  Providing a familiarization with terms and concepts from Tap, Jazz, Ballet and Stage Movement, this workshop give the Young Actor the advantage.  (8-10 weeks)

More classes may be developed over the next few weeks.

Full Tuition for classes:  $125
Discount for Returning or Sibling Students:  $95
LIMITED Scholarship Funds are available, please request a Financial Aid Application from Academy@spotlighters.org

For more information visit www.spotlighters.org.


 

 

The Walters Art Museum
600 N. Charles Street | Phone: 410-547-9000 | Website

 

Memento Mori

Memento Mori: A Night of Rogue Taxidermy
Thursday, September 3, 2015  |  6 PM-9 PM

Artist and rogue taxidermist Robert Marbury will join Curator of Renaissance and Baroque Art Joaneath Spicer for a talk highlighting examples of taxidermy in the museum’s Chamber of Wonders. Following the talk, visitors are invited to join Bazaar Baltimore for an alternative taxidermy competition in the Sculpture Court.

Copies of Taxidermy Art: A Rogue’s Guide by Robert Marbury will be available for sale in the Museum Store.

For more information visit the website.

MakeNightBreathe

Make Night: A Moment to Breathe
Thursday, September 17, 2015  |  6:30 PM to 8:30 PM

Katherine Kasdorf, Mellon Fellow in South Asian and Islamic Art, begins this Make Night with a discussion of works from the Walters’ Asian art collection. Following the talk, Martha McAlpine of Charm City Yoga will lead a 90-minute kundalini yoga workshop for all skill levels in the serene Renaissance Sculpture Court. Kundalini is used to release the “coiled energy” at the base of the spine so that it can flow up and out through the crown of the head. Participants will practice simple breathing techniques paired with repeated physical motions that strengthen and open the physical body.

A limited number of mats will be available, so please bring your own.

Charm City Yoga Members will receive the member discount. Please contact Jayne Levinson or Allison Korycki at 800-336-9642, ext. 1, for the member code.

Martha McAlpine has practiced yoga for 16 years, exploring astanga, vinyasa, yin, kundalini, yoga trance dance, and, most recently, anusara styles of yoga. Her classes emphasize the space from one pose to the next as well as the poses themselves.

Make Night is a unique, dynamic museum program blending good wine and craft beer, great company, and fantastic art-making experiences led by local creative minds.

Click here to register (pre-registration required). Each Make Night includes one drink ticket.

GlobalStories

Telling Global Stories
Sunday, September 20, 2015  |  1:30 PM to 3:30 PM

How does globalization inform the way that museums present art and history? A panel of professionals from museums that have undertaken innovative displays in response to new ideas on “globalized” art history will address the opportunities and pitfalls of reinstalling collections that reflect this theme. Through dialogue with the audience, panelists will guide a conversation about how the Walters might use its displays to reflect a broader cultural context.

Panelists:

Tim Barringer, Paul Mellon Professor of the History of Art, Yale University

Amelia Peck, Marica F. Vilcek Curator, American Wing, and Manager, Henry R. Luce Center for the Study of American Art, The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Sara Devine, Manager of Audience Engagement and Interpretive Materials, Brooklyn Museum

Alex Kalman, Co-founder, Mmuseumm, New York

This event is free. Click here to register (pre-registration is required). Refreshments and snacks will be provided.


Until next month,
laura-sig

Laura Rodini
Executive Director, The Mount Vernon Cultural District

The Mount Vernon Cultural District Is
A Proud Partner of Downtown Partnership of Baltimore and Visit Baltimore

Mount Vernon Celebrates Independence Day

 

 

July, 2015    Volume 3, Issue 6

Dear Reader,

George Washington atop his monument,
courtesy Mount Vernon Place Conservancy

Happy Fourth! This Saturday, Mount Vernon is celebrating a special time in American history with its Monumental Bicentennial, a neighborhood-wide celebration featuring the official reopening of Baltimore’s restored Washington Monument!

Presented by the Mount Vernon Place Conservancy and Bank of America, the event will take place from 8:30am to 5pm. Admission is free.

Beginning at 8:30am, a naturalization ceremony will take place wherein 40 people will become American citizens. The Peabody Institute of The Johns Hopkins University and the Baltimore School for the Arts will perform during this ceremony.

After being closed since 2010, the restored Washington Monument will reopen with an official rededication ceremony and ribbon cutting at 10:45am. The ceremony will include live performances from the Maryland Defense Force Band and Fort McHenry Guard Fife & Drum Band.

Interactive touchscreens,
courtesy Mount Vernon Place Conservancy

The newly reopened Monument will have interactive touchscreens (right) that allow visitors to explore the Monument and the history of Mount Vernon Place. They were created by Cortina Productions. Plus, you’ll once again be able to climb all 228 stairs to the Monument’s top! The view at the top is breathtaking — and a cherished vantage point for our Mount Vernon neighborhood.

The country fair beginning at 11:30am features live entertainment from historical re-enactors including George Washington and several musical acts.

There will be Colonial-style food and picnic fare including Dooby’s fried chicken and corn bread, barbecue by Jurassic Pork, Brewer’s Art Monumental Ale, grilled oysters by Ryleigh’s Oyster, flights of whiskey and Washington State wines from Spirits of Mount Vernon and ice cream by The Charmery. Pahl’s Farmstead will feature a farmer’s market and petting zoo with farm animals on-site. There will also be a baking competition where local bakers compete with recipes for the best cornbread, cherry or peach dessert.

But the festival isn’t limited to Mount Vernon’s Parks. Visitors are encouraged to venture out into the neighborhood where many Mount Vernon institutions and businesses will host activities such as organ performances and tours at the Engineers Club and tours of the George Peabody Library and Peabody Institute. At the Walters Art Museum, you can design your own red, white, and blue pin using paints, sparkles, and more. Then, go inside the museum and find Washington’s portrait to receive a special addition!

Camp Center Stage
and the Baltimore School for the Arts will be performing in the park squares. The Mount Vernon United Methodist Church will be open for the day. The Maryland Historical Society will exhibit artifacts recovered from not one but two time capsules, one hidden away in the 1815 cornerstone and another placed during the 1915 centennial celebration. Also on view will be documents related to Baltimore’s very special Monumental Year of 1815 in an exhibit entitled “Treasures Unearthed From Baltimore’s Washington Monument.”

A sneak peek

Mount Vernon Newsletter readers will be delighted to find a Scavenger Hunt put together by yours truly at the Mount Vernon Cultural District. It takes visitors to six different locations in our beautiful neighborhood. The questions are pretty advanced — see for yourself how many you can answer, then come to our booth, or send your answers to me by replying to this email. Everyone who gets all questions right will win a prize!

It truly will be a neighborhood-wide event! So come out and celebrate one of the most beautiful urban spaces in America, and its special monument to our First President. For more information about the July 4th celebration, visit http://monumentalbicentennial.org/.


 

Upcoming Events In Mount Vernon
Presented in Alphabetical Order

 

Baltimore Symphony Orchestra
1212 Cathedral Street | 410-783-8000 | Website

 

Seth MacFarlane

An Evening with
Seth MacFarlane

Thu, Jul 16, 2015 8 PM
The Meyerhoff

Joel McNeely, conductor

In a special, one-night-only concert, “Family Guy” funny man and Grammy-nominated artist Seth MacFarlane brings his smooth singing talents to Baltimore, performing Sinatra-favorites and showcasing his love of Big Band and American Songbook standards with the BSO.

Tickets range from $28 to $88 and are available through the BSO Ticket Office at 410.783.8000 or BSOmusic.org.

Jonathan Carney

The Four Seasons
Fri, Jul 24, 2015 7:30 PM
The Meyerhoff

Jonathan Carney, leader and violin

Handel: Selections from Water Music
J.S. Bach: Cantata No. 82,
“Ich Habe Genug,” BWV 82
Vivaldi: The Four Seasons

Vivaldi’s vivid depiction of the seasons comes to life as BSO Concertmaster Jonathan Carney expertly weaves his sound through the varied textures of this perennial favorite. This all-Baroque program ends with selections from Handel’s revered Water Music, a work that premiered on the River Thames at the request of King George I.

Tickets range from $25 to $45 and are available through the BSO Ticket Office at 410.783.8000 or BSOmusic.org.

Enoch Pratt Free Library
400 Cathedral Street | 410-396-5430 | Website

 

Writers LIVE: Suzanna Rosa Molino, BALTIMORE’S LITTLE ITALY: History and Heritage of The Neighborhood
Saturday, July 11, 2:30 PM

Baltimore's Little Italy

With memories of beloved local figures like Marion “Mugs” Mugavero and artist Tony DeSales, interviews with lifelong locals and a few classic recipes, author Suzanna Rosa Molino creates a spirited history of this enduring Italian community.

Local writer Suzanna Molino, author of Baltimore’s Little Italy, is a native Baltimorean and the founder and director of the nonprofit organization, Promotion Center for Little Italy, Baltimore. She is the granddaughter of four Italian immigrants from Abruzzi and Sardinia.

Writers LIVE programs are supported in part by a generous grant from PNC Bank.

Copies of the author’s book will be for sale at a book signing following the program. Click here for more information.

Location: Southeast Anchor Library, Auditorium 3601 Eastern Avenue Baltimore, MD 21224

Dreadlocks, Rock ‘n Roll & Human Rights:
A One-Man Show by Ron Kipling Williams

Wednesday, July 22, 6:30 PM to 8 PM

Ron Kipling Williams

Dreadlocks, Rock ‘n Roll & Human Rights is an autobiographical play about a black youth who rocks and rolls to his own beat and is forced to battle racism, stereotypes and ignorance. It is a thought-provoking tale of a man who struggles against society’s intolerance and fights to create a world of acceptance.

Ron Kipling Williams, the show’s author and performer, is an award-winning performance artist, poet, and human rights activist. He is currently a graduate student in the MFA/Creative Writing and Publishing Arts program and an instructor of writing composition at the University of Baltimore. He won a Baltimore City African American Male Unsung Hero Award for his artist/activist work. Ron has performed and lectured in numerous venues throughout the Mid-Atlantic Region, and has been featured on several radio and television programs. Ron won the Maryland Arts Council Individual Artist Award for his one-man show, If the World Were Like Fat Albert and the Cosby Kids. He has served as facilitator and mentor in public schools, after-school programs, and youth organizations. Ron received a United Workers Human Rights Champion award for his work as a media ally and organizer. His one-man show, Dreadlocks, Rock & Roll and Human Rights, received critical acclaim from the Baltimore Sun and was a hit at the Charm City Fringe Festival.

Click here for more information.

Location: Central Library, Meyerhoff Children’s Garden, Night Room 400 Cathedral Street, Baltimore, MD 21201

Maryland Historical Society
201 W. Monument Street | Phone 410-685-3750 | Website

 

A New Exhibit! Treasures Unearthed From Baltimore’s Washington Monument

Time Capsule

Beginning July 4, 2015, The Maryland Historical Society will proudly display items recovered from not one but two time capsules in Baltimore’s Washington Monument, as well as other important documents surrounding the Monument’s creation. The exhibit, entitled “Treasures Unearthed From Baltimore’s Washington Monument,” will open in coordination with the Monumental Bicentennial, an all-day neighborhood-wide celebration presented by the Mount Vernon Place Conservancy and Bank of America. Admission to the Maryland Historical Society will be free all day on July 4th! The exhibition will be on public view through December 31, 2015.

“The Maryland Historical Society is extremely excited to temporarily join the time capsules and their contents with so much allied material in our museum and library collections,” says Maryland Historical Society President-Elect Mark B. Letzer. “It is especially significant that these items will be on display during the monument’s bicentennial.”

About the Time Capsules

During the $5.5 million restoration of the Washington Monument, begun in January 2014 by the Mount Vernon Place Conservancy, not one, but two time capsules were discovered. Both were located during construction investigations by project superintendent George E. Wilk II of Lewis Contractors.

The 1815 Time Capsule was hidden away in the Monument’s cornerstone. On February 18, 2015, the cornerstone’s outer lid was removed, revealing an inner lid carved with the names of the Monument’s original stonecutters and masons. Beneath this were three glass jars stuffed with newspapers and wrapped bundles. Barely visible below the jars was a metal plate said in the original accounts to commemorate the day. The items were removed from the well by conservators from the Walters Art Museum and taken to the Maryland State Archives for further treatment. Despite their age and original damp condition, the items are in remarkably good condition.

Contents of the 1815 Time Capsule on display include:

    • U.S. coins, in copper, silver and gold

 

    • The Holy Bible published in Baltimore by John Hagerty in 1812. This item is significant because it was printed in ‘Diamond Type,’ a typeface developed in Baltimore at the Baltimore Type Foundry

 

  • A copy of the Declaration of Independence, reprinted in the Federal Gazette on July 3, 1815, the day before the cornerstone was laid

The 1915 Time Capsule was discovered in October 2014 behind a bronze plaque commemorating the Monument’s Centennial. A selection of its contents will also be on display.


At The Library: See Rejected Designs for Baltimore’s Washington Monument

Design for the Washington Monument
Design for the Washington Monument. Washington Monument drawing competition, 1813,” Joseph Jacques Ramée, MdHS, CB5472

The Neoclassical column at the center of Mount Vernon Place tells only part of the fascinating history of Baltimore’s most famous landmark. Among the Maryland Historical Society’s rich manuscript collection are the original papers of the Washington Monument’s Board of Managers, who oversaw the fundraising and construction of the monument constructed to honor the country’s first president.

Also on display in “Treasures Unearthed From Baltimore’s Washington Monument,” will be an assortment of designs that were not selected for the project, along with correspondence between the Board of Managers and the competition’s eventual winner, architect Robert Mills. The correspondence is significant in that it describes a new, ‘American’ design aesthetic, one that was counter to prevailing European sentiments of the time.

The ‘First American Architect’

Mills' original design submission
Mills’ original design submission, 1814, Elevation on the Principal Fronts,
MdHS, MS876

In 1813, an architectural competition was announced to build a structure in tribute to Washington at a cost of $100,000. The Board of Managers solicited proposals from European and American architects, and received a handful, including one from French-born architect Joseph Ramée, pictured at top, then working in America.

The Board of Managers, however, hoped an American architect would win this competition to erect a monument to America’s Founding Father. Self-described “First American Architect” Robert Mills submitted his designs with a letter, stating:

Being an American by birth and having also the honor of being the first American who has passed through a regular course of study of architecture in his own country, it is natural for me to feel much solicitude to aspire to the honor of raising a monument to the memory of our illustrious countryman.

…For the honor of our country, my sincere wish is that it may not be said; To foreign genius and to foreign hands we are indebted for a monument to perpetuate the Glory of our beloved Chief.

Mills’ original submission (pictured above) included an ornate rendering of the column, with seven tiers that illustrated important moments of George Washington’s life. The Board of Managers selected his design on May 2, 1814, but some adjustments needed to be made. First, due to concerns about the monument’s height, the location of the monument was moved from Monument Square (where the Battle Monument presently stands) to Howard’s Woods. Second, because of budgetary constraints, Mills was asked to revise his design to the more simplistic view that stands today. The final cost of the monument’s cost was $203,764.08, more than $100,000 above the original budget. Lottery tickets from the 1813 lottery created to help offset the monument’s cost are also on display in “Treasures Unearthed From Baltimore’s Washington Monument.”

“These papers have provided important clues for the monument’s restoration,” says Lance Humphries, PhD, Mount Vernon Place Conservancy “…they provide a level of detail that seldom survive, including a bill from apothecary Robert Aitken for a bottle ‘to deposit in corner stone.'”

The Maryland Humanities Council
108 West Centre Street | 410-685-0095 | Website

 

Mt Vernon Tour

Literary Walking Tour of Mt. Vernon
July 18, 2015, 11 AM

Take this guided 90-minute walking tour with the Maryland Humanities Council, past Mount Vernon’s elegant mansions and majestic cultural institutions. Follow in the footsteps of the many famous authors, poets, and editors who sojourned in Baltimore’s cultural hub.

Register at www.2015MtVernonLitWalk.eventbrite.com. Registration is required for this tour. Contact Jessica Baldwin at (410) 685-3715 for more information.

Location: Meet the guide at the Enoch Pratt Free Library, 400 Cathedral Street, Baltimore, MD 21201.

Spotlighters Theatre
817 Saint Paul Street | Phone: 410-752-1225 | Website

 

Altar Boyz
July 10 – August 2, 2015

Book by Kevin Del Aguila
Music and Lyrics: Gary Adler and Michael Patrick Walker
Conceived By Marc Kessler and Ken Davenport
Director: Jillian Bauersfeld
Musical Director: Michael Tan

ALTAR BOYZ

“There is no star as bright as its constellation, no harmony in a single voice.”

Synopsis: ALTAR BOYZ is a foot-stomping, rafter-raising, musical comedy about a fictitious Christian boy-band on the last night of their national ‘Raise the Praise’ tour. The Boyz are five all-singing, all-dancing heartthrobs from Ohio: Matthew, Mark, Luke, Juan and Abraham. As they perform their signature hits such as ‘Rhythm In Me,’ ‘The Calling,’ and ‘I Believe,’ the Boyz question their loyalty to each other and ask whether or not faith is really holding them together. They finally deliver a message of unity, that ‘there is no star as bright as its constellation, no harmony in a single voice.’ Presented by arrangement with Rodgers & Hammerstein Theatricals.

Tickets: Adults $20; Seniors (60+) $18; Students & Military $16.
Ten Spot Thursday – ALL TICKETS JUST $10: Thursday, July 16, 2015 at 8 PM (no other discounts apply)

Talk Back with Cast & Director: Sunday, July 26, 2015 immediately following the performance.

Performance Dates: July 10, 11, 12; July 16, 17, 18, 19; July 24, 25, 26; July 31, Aug 1, 2.

Click here to purchase tickets.

The Walters Art Museum
600 N. Charles Street | Phone: 410-547-9000 | Website

 

Sushi by Hand

Make Night: Sushi by Hand
Thursday, July 16, 2015 | 6:30 PM-9 PM

Kaimana Chee of Kaimana’s Catering will be at the Walters to show workshop participants everything you need to know to make your own sushi at home, with specific lessons on preparing vegetable and California rolls. The workshop begins with a brief talk on Japanese art from the Walters’ collection by Chief Curator Robert Mintz, the Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Quincy Scott Curator of Asian Art.

Make Night is a unique, dynamic museum program blending good wine and craft beer, great company, and fantastic art-making experiences led by local creative minds. Pre-registration required. Each Make Night includes one drink ticket.

Click here to register.

ART/SOUND/NOW

ART/SOUND/NOW: Eric Derr & Max Bent
Thursday, July 23, 2015 | 7 PM to 8:30 PM

This summer a beatboxer, spoken word artist, electronic musician, percussionist, and vocalist will turn the galleries at the Walters into dynamic spaces with music, sound, art, and insightful commentary by museum experts. A new way to experience the museum on Thursday Nights! Open until 9 p.m.

The second concert in the ART/SOUND/NOW series features the percussion of Eric Derr and the beatboxing of Max Bent. Mr. Derr will be joined by Susan Wager, Mellon Curatorial Postdoctoral Fellow at the Walters, for a guided tour of the Museum’s 18th-century gallery, where works by painter Giovanni Tiepolo and composer Carolyn Chen will spur a conversation about time and space. Mr. Bent, who will create original compositions based on chants in early music, will be joined by medieval art curator Martina Bagnoli to explore the ideas of awe and mystery within the Walters’ collection of medieval art. Ticket holders will enjoy a private bar, a complimentary drink voucher, and exclusive access to the Museum’s third-floor galleries during this evening of intimate conversation and exciting music.

This performance is part of a three part summer music series. Receive a discount to all three performances if you register for the series.

Click here to register for this performance.

Until next month,
laura-sig

Laura Rodini
Executive Director, The Mount Vernon Cultural District

The Mount Vernon Cultural District Is
A Proud Partner of Downtown Partnership of Baltimore and Visit Baltimore

A Monumental Bicentennial

June, 2015 Volume 3, Issue 5

Dear Reader,

Baltimore’s Washington Monument (courtesy Wikipedia)

With its cornerstone laid on July 4, 1815, Mount Vernon’s Washington Monument became the first public monument to honor George Washington and the ideals of American Democracy he represented.

This July 4, Baltimore is celebrating this special time in American history with the Monumental Bicentennial, a one-day celebration featuring the official reopening of Baltimore’s restored Washington Monument!

Presented by the Mount Vernon Place Conservancy and Bank of America, the event will take place from 8:30am to 5pm and includes a naturalization ceremony, an official rededication and a ribbon cutting ceremony. An old-fashioned country fair follows with entertainment, children’s activities, baking contests, delicious food and beverages and more. The Monumental Bicentennial is produced by the Baltimore Office of Promotion & The Arts in partnership with the Mount Vernon Place Conservancy. Admission is free.

Beginning at 8:30am on July 4th, a naturalization ceremony will take place wherein 40 people will become American citizens. The Peabody Institute of The Johns Hopkins University and the Baltimore School for the Arts will perform during this ceremony.

After being closed since 2010, the restored Washington Monument will reopen with an official rededication ceremony and ribbon cutting at 10:45am. The ceremony will include live performances from the Maryland Defense Force Band and Fort McHenry Guard Fife & Drum Band.

The country fair beginning at 11:30am features live entertainment from historical re-enactors including George Washington and several musical acts.

There will be Colonial-style food and picnic fare including Dooby’s fried chicken and corn bread, barbecue by Jurassic Pork, Brewer’s Art Monumental Ale, grilled oysters by Ryleigh’s Oyster, flights of whiskey and Washington State wines from Spirits of Mount Vernon and ice cream by The Charmery.

Pahl’s Farmstead will feature a farmer’s market and petting zoo with farm animals on-site. There will also be a baking competition where local bakers compete with recipes for the best cornbread, cherry or peach dessert.

Gold Eagle ($10), Half Eagle $5, and Quarter Eagle ($2.5) coins from the 1915 time capsule

But the festival isn’t limited to Mount Vernon’s Parks. Visitors are encouraged to venture out into the neighborhood where many Mount Vernon institutions and businesses will host activities such as a neighborhood scavenger hunt, organ performances and tours at the Engineers Club and tours of the George Peabody Library and Peabody Institute. At the Walters Art Museum, you can design your own red, white, and blue pin using paints, sparkles, and more. Then, go inside the museum and find Washington’s portrait to receive a special addition!

Camp Center Stage
and the Baltimore School for the Arts will be performing in the park squares. The Mount Vernon United Methodist Church will be open for the day. The Maryland Historical Society will exhibit artifacts recovered from not one but two time capsules, one hidden away in the 1815 cornerstone and another placed during the 1915 centennial celebration. Also on view will be documents related to Baltimore’s very special Monumental Year of 1815 in an exhibit entitled “Treasures Unearthed From Baltimore’s Washington Monument.”

It truly will be a neighborhood-wide event! So come out and celebrate one of the most beautiful urban spaces in America, and its special monument to our First President. For more information about the July 4th celebration, visit http://monumentalbicentennial.org/.


Upcoming News & Events In Mount Vernon
Presented in Alphabetical Order 

Baltimore School For the Arts
712 Cathedral Street | 443-642-5167 | Website

BSA Theatre Department Head Donald Hicken has been named a finalist for Tony Awards® Excellence in Theatre Education Award!

In addition to his work as an educator, mentor and leader at BSA (since 1979), Donald Hicken has an incredible impact in theatre. At BSA, his productions include: Romeo and Juliet, Lysistrata, The Rimers of Eldridge, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Marat/Sade, his own adaptation of The Wind in the Willows, and Our Town, to name a fewHicken founded The Center Stage Conservatory, The Actors’ Conservatory and has taught master classes at The Berkshire Theatre Festival where he developed Fog People, a celebration of the Eugene O’Neill centenary. He also serves as the Chairman of the Education Committee for the Hippodrome Foundation, and oversees all youth programming for the historic Hippodrome Theatre.

The Excellence in Theatre Education Award is a special honor that recognizes K-12 theatre educators in the U.S. who have demonstrated monumental impact on the lives of students and who embody the highest standards of the profession. Chris Ford, BSA Director, reiterated the important message that was evident in the nomination and all of the letters of support, “Donald believes theater can change the world and students’ lives for the better. He has dedicated his life to transform lives through the arts. We are so happy for him today.”

Donald Hicken will attend the Tony Awards on Sunday, June 7, at Radio City Music Hall.


Baltimore Symphony Orchestra
1212 Cathedral Street | 410-783-8000 | Website

Marin Alsop

Bernstein’s Candide
Marin Alsop, conductor
Garnett Bruce, director
Baltimore Choral Arts Society,
Tom Hall, music director

Fri, Jun 12, 2015 8 PM
Sat, Jun 13, 2015 8 PM
Sun, Jun 14, 2015 3 PM
All events held at the Meyerhoff

Celebrate the end of the BSO’s season with Leonard Bernstein’s brilliant comedic operetta Candide! Based on the classic Voltaire tale of innocence, optimism and the unexpected lessons of life, Marin Alsop conducts this semi-staged operetta with Broadway’s brightest stars!

Tickets range from $40 to $100 and are available through the BSO Ticket Office at 410.783.8000 or BSOmusic.org.

Center Stage
700 North Calvert Street | 410-332-0033 | Website

MARLEYFIN

May 8 – Jun 14
Marley
Music and Lyrics by Bob Marley
Book by Kwame Kwei-Armah

From Center Stage Artistic Director Kwame Kwei-Armah, comes a world premiere musical based on the life and music of Bob Marley. After surviving an assassination attempt in 1976, Marley left Jamaica for London, where he spent nearly two years in self-imposed exile. Chronicling the events surrounding this earth-shaking moment, Marley tells the story of a man transformed into one of the 20th Century’s most important cultural figures. Set in the soundscape of an era, this new musical weaves together the life and music of a man who, to heal himself, first healed his homeland. Click here for tickets and more information.

MARLEYFIN

Friday, June 5, 8 PM Show
Stir It Up at Center Stage

Join us on June 5 for a Marley performance and a jammin’ after party! Dance, drink and share positive vibrations with the cast members, enjoy complimentary Jamaican food, wine, and beer as you jam to Rufus Roundtree & Da B’more Brass Factory.

TICKETS INCLUDE:
Marley Performance
Open Bar with Beer & Wine
Free Jamaican Food
$5 Jamaican Rum Punch

Ticket Information for Marley Performance and Stir It Up Party: single $75, couple $120. Click here for tickets.

Enoch Pratt Free Library
400 Cathedral Street | 410-396-5430 | Website

Sponsor a child

Summer Reading, the cornerstone of our Summer Learning Program, is an incentive and theme-based reading program that encourages children and teens to read during the nine-week session. To make reading fun, children enjoy performances by musicians, dancers, magicians, story tellers, authors, illustrators and cartoonists.

Last year more than 38,500 children and teens participated in Pratt’s summer programs, with more than 15,800 children enrolled in the incentive-based Summer Reading Program. Kindergarten through 5th-grade participants logged more than 5.2 million minutes of reading, and our teen participants read over 8,000 books!

Summer Reading helps reduce “summer slide”, a loss of academic skills that students may experience in July and August. This loss is nearly impossible to make up, compounds over time, and particularly impacts children in underserved communities.

It costs just $60 to sponsor a child for a whole summer’s worth of library programs. Please sponsor one or more children and help reduce summer slide!

For questions or assistance, please contact us at giving@prattlibrary.org or
410-396-5283.

Maryland Historical Society
201 W. Monument Street | Phone 410-685-3750 | Website

Announcing BaltimoreUprising2015.org

Theo Anthony
Theo Anthony, “Untitled,” Preserve the Baltimore Uprising: Your Stories. Your Pictures. Your Stuff. Your History.

The events unfolding around the city in the wake of Freddie Gray’s death are important and historic. So many people are walking around with cell phone cameras in their pockets. That means more people than ever before can participate in recording and preserving history as it unfolds. The Maryland Historical Society believes that it is important that these materials are preserved in a historical repository so they are not lost.

As protests took place during late April/early May, the Maryland Historical Society asked the general public to send us photographs and other materials to document the demonstrations, unrest, and cleanup efforts.

The response has been overwhelming.

Photographs, videos, and oral histories have been sent in from young, old, amateur, and professional documentarians. These materials are being posted to the website, www.baltimoreuprising2015.org/cms.

The website is a collaborative effort between the Maryland Historical Society and faculty from the University of Baltimore and the University of Maryland Baltimore County. The Maryland Historical Society is actively seeking additional partners to help gather as many materials as possible.

Now, you can contribute your digital materials directly to the website!

If you want to help preserve the Baltimore Uprising, please click and download this PDF explaining the 10 easy steps to uploading materials.

If you are interested in joining our efforts to Preserve the Baltimore Uprising and have questions about how you can join in, please contact Joe Tropea at the Maryland Historical Society by email at remembrance@mdhs.org.


The Maryland Humanities Council
108 West Centre Street | 410-685-0095 | Website

Mt Vernon Tour

June 20, 2015, 11 AM
Literary Walking Tour of Mt. Vernon

Take this guided 90-minute walking tour with the Maryland Humanities Council, past Mount Vernon’s elegant mansions and majestic cultural institutions. Follow in the footsteps of the many famous authors, poets, and editors who sojourned in Baltimore’s cultural hub.

Register at www.2015MtVernonLitWalk.eventbrite.com. Registration is required for this tour.

Location: Meet the guide at the Enoch Pratt Free Library, 400 Cathedral Street, Baltimore, MD 21201.

Spotlighters Theatre
817 Saint Paul Street | Phone: 410-752-1225 | Website

DOG SEES GOD

June 5 – June 28, 2015
DOG SEES GOD –
confessions of a teenage blockhead

by Bert V. Royal
Fuzz Roark, director

Synopsis: CB begins to question the existence of an afterlife. His best friend is too burnt out to provide any coherent speculation; his sister has gone goth; his ex-girlfriend has recently been institutionalized; and his other friends are too inebriated to give him any sort of solace. But a chance meeting with an artistic kid, the target of this group’s bullying, offers CB a peace of mind and sets in motion a friendship that will push teen angst to the very limits. Drug use, suicide, eating disorders, teen violence, rebellion and sexual identity collide and careen toward an ending that’s both haunting and hopeful.

Tickets: Adults $20; Seniors (60+) $18; Students & Military $16.
Ten Spot Thursday – ALL TICKETS JUST $10: Thursday, June 11, 2015 at 8 PM (no other discounts apply)

Discussions will follow each performance – addressing the issues and questions raised each evening!

Performance Dates: June 5, 6, 7; June 11, 12, 13, 14; June 19, 20, 21; June 26, 27, 28.
Click here for more information and to purchase tickets.

Young Actors

The 2015 Young Actors Academy! – Registration open!

Lower School Academy – 2015 (grades k – 5)
Program is divided in to Lower School I (K – 2 grades) and Lower School II (3 – 5 grades)

Five one week modules are designed to provide an approach to acting, play writing, and the general craft of storytelling; students come away with notions of dramatic structure, character development, monologue and scene work, and more.

A morning snack, lunch and afternoon snack are provided through the Baltimore Summer Lunch Program (a joint mission of the Department of Agriculture and Baltimore Housing Authority.)

Click here for more information on the Lower School I and II Academies.

Upper School Academy – 2015 (grades 6 – 12)

Young Actors

A five week theatre intensive providing a range of education for both the Classical Theatre student and the Musical Theatre student.

Classical Theatre students will have workshops in Acting Methods, Improv, Stage Combat, Movement, and Make-up.

Musical Theatre
students will have workshops in Voice, Dance, Music Reading, Stage Combat and Make-up.

All classes are taught by regional and national theatre professionals.

Click here for more information on the Lower School I and II Academies.

The Walters Art Museum
600 N. Charles Street | Phone: 410-547-9000 | Website

Rinehart

Rinehart’s Studio: Rough Stone to Living Marble
Sunday, Mar 29, 2015 – Sunday, Aug 30, 2015
10 AM to 5 PM (Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday)

This spring, the Walters story continues with an exhibition exploring the workshop of 19th-century sculptor William Henry Rinehart, a Maryland-born artist whose works were among William T. Walters’ earliest acquisitions.

Today the Walters Art Museum contains an extensive collection of Rinehart’s exquisite sculptures, including marble portrait busts of Walters family members. Rinehart’s work can also be seen in Baltimore’s Mt. Vernon Place and Green Mount Cemetery, and is in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the National Gallery of Art, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, and the Baltimore Museum of Art.

Rinehart’s Studio: Rough Stone to Living Marble is a counterpart to HAND/MADE, an exhibition at the Maryland Institute College of Art. Organized by students in MICA’s Exhibition Development Seminar (EDS), HAND/MADE showcases works of multi-disciplinary contemporary sculptors alongside a 19th-century marble work by Rinehart, a former MICA student. It will be on view at MICA’s Fox Building, Decker Gallery from January 30 through March 15.

This exhibition has been generously supported by Anonymous and the Helen M. Hughes Trust. Click here for more information.

Photo: William Henry Rinehart, Sleeping Children, Maryland Institute College of Art. Photograph by John Dean.

Gold of the Ancient Americas

Gold of the Ancient Americas
Saturday, May 9, 2015 – Sunday, October 11, 2015
10 AM to 5 PM

Gold of the Ancient Americas showcases more than 50 artifacts, including cast animal pendants, a hammered gold disc, beaded necklaces and nose ornaments made by the indigenous peoples of the ancient Americas from Peru to Panama. The exhibition explores the Walters’ collection of gold ornaments crafted in Central and South America between AD 500 and 1500, alongside gifts to the collection from several generous donors.

A mix of art and science, the exhibition tells the story of ancient societies through their use of gold as a symbol of power, wealth, and privilege, and highlights the making of gold objects by ancient American goldsmiths before the Spanish conquest. Click here for more information.

Gallery drawing

Gallery Drawing Family Workshop: Human Form
Saturday, June 27, 2015
10:30 AM to 12 PM

Learn from the masters as we explore strategies that will help you depict the human form and discover a personal approach to drawing.

Young artists are invited to strengthen their observational drawing skills and build their portfolios while exploring works of art in the Walters’ collection. Participants will have an opportunity to think creatively and express their personal voices while drawing in the galleries. This family-oriented workshop is designed for kids and their favorite adults to enjoy together. Led by a museum educator who is a practicing artist, each month will focus on a different skill and theme. Materials are provided. Beginners welcome!

Click here for more information, or to register.

Until next month,
laura-sig

Laura Rodini
Executive Director, The Mount Vernon Cultural District

The Mount Vernon Cultural District Is
A Proud Partner of Downtown Partnership of Baltimore and Visit Baltimore

Baltimore Strong

May, 2015, Volume 3, Issue 4

Dear Reader,

Board-close up
Just three days after the riots, Trinacria reopened its doors. Well-wishers left messages on the temporary plywood windows, above.

There isn’t one person who lives or works in Baltimore who hasn’t been affected by the recent unrest.

And while the glare of the national media focused on the violence that occurred, there is another story to tell — one that is unfolding as we speak.

We are Baltimore Strong.

“I have a lot of faith in the city and tourism in Baltimore,” says Mount Vernon Cultural District Member Haluk Kantar, who owns Cazbar and HomeSlyce.

The afternoon of April 27, Kantar shielded restaurant patrons from a group of rioters who came thru Mount Vernon. Some businesses, like Trinacria, 7/11 and Cozy Corner, were destroyed and looted; others, like Midtown BBQ, Mick O’Sheas, Lumbini and Cazbar, sustained broken windows and other damage. A total of 15 Mount Vernon businesses were hit.

Cazbar
Haluk Kantar, owner of Cazbar and HomeSlyce. Keep Baltimore Strong by supporting our businesses.

As soon as the smoke cleared, Mount Vernon residents and business owners came together to assess what happened. Kantar and his neighbors swept the streets clean of debris, replaced the damaged pieces, and then reopened.

“The only thing we can do is open up, clean up, show people there is life,” Kantar says. He says he saw a 50% drop in walk-in and catering business last week. “It will take a while, but I am optimistic we will come back.”

Mount Vernon’s arts institutions play an important role in Baltimore, as they represent the city’s cultural heart. Each of our Mount Vernon Cultural District members is helping the city to heal, by hosting performances responding to current events, maintaining regularly scheduled programming, or, simply, by being open.

I encourage you to help keep Baltimore Strong every day by supporting our Mount Vernon businesses and institutions.


The Arts Community Responds

Open
Enoch Pratt CEO Dr. Carla Hayden welcomes patrons

The Enoch Pratt Library System: A Safe Haven

As Newsweek noted, just one day after the city unrest, all 22 branches of the Enoch Pratt Free Library opened, including the branch at Pennsylvania & North Ave.

“It’s at times like this that the community needs us,” says Communications Director Roswell Encina, “That’s what the library has always been there for, from crises like this to a recession to the aftermath of severe weather. The library has been there.”

With its Central Branch located in Mount Vernon, the Library has been organizing food and supply drives to hardest-hit areas. Click here for a complete list of events and initiatives at the Enoch Pratt Library.


The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra
Performs Free Concerts

Baltimore Symphony Orchestra

On Wednesday, April 29, outside the Meyerhoff, the musicians of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra played a free concert in support of our community.

“It seems we could all use a little music in our lives right about now,” they said, and, quoting Leonard Bernstein, added, “This will be our reply to violence: to make music more intensely, more beautifully, more devotedly than ever before.”

The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra is planning on hosting additional free Music For Peace performances throughout the city. For a complete list of May events at the BSO,
click here.


Maryland Historical Society
Issues A Call For Photographs

The Maryland Historical Society has issued a public call for images from professional and amateur photographers in order to document the Freddie Gray protests, unrest and cleanup efforts in Baltimore. “We believe this is an important topic for public history,” says Maryland Historical Society President Burt Kummerow. “We have the resources to interpret these events as well as what has happened in the past.”

Images may be submitted to the Maryland Historical Society through Dropbox at Remembrance@mdhs.org.

Submissions should your name, email address, date and location that images were taken, and camera type/model.

The photographic images will become part of a digital collection that will be housed on a WordPress website maintained by The Maryland Historical Society. By submitting images to the Society, photographers should be assured that they are not waiving their rights to these images. The Maryland Historical Society hopes to make these images available for viewing by the general public, the Maryland State Archives and the National Archives.

In addition, the Maryland Historical Society will also be collecting objects and oral histories from protestors and civil rights leaders in Baltimore.


Mount Vernon Is Open For Business!
Here’s a look at what else happening in our neighborhood this month.
Presented in Alphabetical Order

Baltimore School For the Arts
712 Cathedral Street | 443-642-5167 | Website

Jacques Brel

May 6 – May 9, 2015
Spring Theatre Performance

Join us for Prophets of Death, an original work written by Tony Tsendeas featuring the Senior Acting Ensemble. Directed by Donald Hicken. Contact cbrown@bsfa.org for more information.

Tickets: $5, $10. Click here to purchase.

Performance Dates: May 6 at 5 PM, May 7 at 5 PM, May 8 at 7 PM, May 9 at 3 PM at the Shakur Black Box Theater

Jacques Brel

May 8, 2015 at 5 PM
Spring Theatre Performance

Join us for the year’s final dance concert! Includes a reprise of “Bust A Move” as well as other pieces. The final production of the year for our young dancers is a mixed bill of classical ballet and contemporary work. Included in this is a piece choreographed by BSA alumnus and Tulane University professor Jeffery Gunshol with collaboration from the senior class.

Tickets: $5, $10. Click here to purchase.

Center Stage
700 North Calvert Street | 410-332-0033 | Website

 

MARLEYFIN

May 8 – Jun 14
Marley
Music and Lyrics by Bob Marley
Book by Kwame Kwei-Armah

From Center Stage Artistic Director Kwame Kwei-Armah, comes a world premiere musical based on the life and music of Bob Marley. After surviving an assassination attempt in 1976, Marley left Jamaica for London, where he spent nearly two years in self-imposed exile. Chronicling the events surrounding this earth-shaking moment, Marley tells the story of a man transformed into one of the 20th Century’s most important cultural figures. Set in the soundscape of an era, this new musical weaves together the life and music of a man who, to heal himself, first healed his homeland.

Click here for tickets and more information.

Stir It Up

Friday, June 5, 8 PM Show
Stir It Up at Center Stage

Join us on June 5 for a Marley performance and a jammin’ after party! Dance, drink and share positive vibrations with the cast members, enjoy complimentary Jamaican food, wine, and beer as you jam to Rufus Roundtree & Da B’more Brass Factory.

TICKETS INCLUDE:
Marley Performance
Open Bar with Beer & Wine
Free Jamaican Food
$5 Jamaican Rum Punch

Ticket Information for Marley Performance and Stir It Up Party: single $75, couple $120. Click here for tickets.

The Maryland Humanities Council
108 West Centre Street | 410-685-0095 | Website

Dancers

The Maryland Humanities Council supported traveling exhibition, “Moving History/History Moving: Stepping Down the Path of Peabody Dance through 100 Years of Maryland History” is on view at the Peabody Mews Gallery on May 9. Marylanders can discover the Institute’s history within the context of dance in Baltimore and statewide, major historical figures in dance, and national dance movements. Five recently restored historical films dating back to 1930s are among the items that transport viewers along the path of Peabody Dance.

The Maryland Humanities Council

The Maryland Humanities Council’s popular monthly Literary Mt. Vernon Walking Tours continue Saturday, May 16 and at the low cost of $10 per person. Tour goers will learn of the novelists, muckrakers, Pulitzer Prize-winning poets and authors, rappers, and editors who lived, worked or visited the cultural district, with a little history thrown in and sense of place to boot. The two-hour walking tour also includes a unique, hands-on experience with a presentation by Peabody Library Curator Paul Espinosa on some of the Library’s treasured collections. Appropriate for high school aged walkers and above.

Reserve your spot online today!

Humanities Connection

WYPR Radio’s Humanities Connection

You can hear all about the latest Maryland Humanities Council’s programs by tuning in to WYPR Radio’s Humanities Connection on Thursdays at 4:44 PM.

Check out these upcoming programs:

May 21
Humanities Connection: The Quince Orchard Project

Has your community had a ‘past life?’ Does your home address have a back-story? Jason Green is many things: attorney, entrepreneur, political strategist and documentary film maker. After discovering something new about his 95 year-old grandmother, he set out to capture the memories of the residents of Quince Orchard, a post-Civil War predominantly African American community near Gaithersburg that thrived for a century before vanishing. Recently he was named as a Docs in Progress 2015 Fellow, for The Quince Orchard Project, a documentary film which examining the history and heritage of this lost community. Today he shares one such remembrance.

May 28
Humanities Connection: We are Different People in Different Places

Elizabeth Evitts Dickinson is a fiction and non-fiction author who has written about the built environment and its relationship to humans and culture for nearly two decades. She is also contributing editor with Architect and Architectural Lighting magazines, and teaches at the Maryland Institute College of Art. Today she reflects on the role public places play in shaping urban life and culture.

Check out WYPR’s archive of shows by clicking here.

A Special MHC Program at Hampton National Historic Site!

Come out to Hampton National Historic Site for “On the Hampton Plantation: The Overseer’s House, Slave Quarters and Farm” on May 23, 2015 at 2 PM.

Dressed in period attire, Park Ranger Anokwale will guide visitors through the authentic slave quarters, dairy and overseer’s home and give voice to the enslaved African Americans who made the Ridgelys’ lavish lifestyle possible. Participants will have the opportunity to experience first hand, replicas of items used during the 1800s on the plantation. Bring the entire family. Please remember that all events and programs at Hampton are FREE, open to the public. and ADA compliant. We do not accept reservations and seating is available on a first come first seated basis. Leave plenty of time to travel to the site, park your car, and walk to the appropriate location.

Hampton National Historic Site is located at 535 Hampton Ln. in Towson, MD 21286 Call 410-823-1309 x251 for more details.

Spotlighters Theatre
817 Saint Paul Street | Phone: 410-752-1225 | Website

Jacques Brel

May 1 – May 24, 2015
Jacques Brel is Alive and Well
and Living in Paris

Production conception, English lyrics, additional material by Eric Blau and Mort Shuman based on Jacques Brel’s lyrics and commentary
music: Jacques Brel
director: Timoth David Copney
musical director: Michael Tan

Synopsis: The poignant, passionate and profound songs of Belgian songwriter Jacques Brel are brought to vivid theatrical life in this intense musical experience. Brel’s legendary romance, humor and moral conviction are evoked simply and directly – a powerful, intimate, bold and emotional evening of theatre. Brimming with flair, attitude and European sophistication, these rich compositions bring to mind the groundbreaking work of Kurt Weill and Bertolt Brecht, creating a universe all their own that consistently startles with its daring, candor and insight.

Presented by arrangement with Dramatists Play Service.

Tickets: Adults $20; Seniors (60+) $18; Students & Military $16.

Talk Back with Cast & Director: Sunday, May 17, 2015 immediately following the performance.

Performance Dates: May 8, 9, 10; May 15, 16, 17; May 22, 23, 24.

Click here for more information and to purchase tickets.

The Walters Art Museum
600 N. Charles Street | Phone: 410-547-9000 | Website

Walters and Morgan State Announce Strategic Partnership

On April 28, The Walters Art Museum and Morgan State University announced a new, multi-year partnership that will promote exhibitions, develop educational and artistic programs and create professional development opportunities for students and faculty at Morgan and staff of the Walters.

“The strategic partnership, formalized today, focuses on opportunities that will benefit both institutions, as well as the diverse citizens of the Baltimore region,” said Executive Director Julia Marciari-Alexander. “Through this unique relationship, we hope to create deep systemic organizational change and have a creative and economic impact on the city.”

A New Exhibition at The Walters!

Gold of the Ancient Americas

Gold of the Ancient Americas
Saturday, May 9, 2015 – Sunday, October 11, 2015
10 AM to 5 PM

Gold of the Ancient Americas showcases more than 50 artifacts, including cast animal pendants, a hammered gold disc, beaded necklaces and nose ornaments made by the indigenous peoples of the ancient Americas from Peru to Panama. The exhibition explores the Walters’ collection of gold ornaments crafted in Central and South America between AD 500 and 1500, alongside gifts to the collection from several generous donors.

A mix of art and science, the exhibition tells the story of ancient societies through their use of gold as a symbol of power, wealth, and privilege, and highlights the making of gold objects by ancient American goldsmiths before the Spanish conquest.


Until next month,
laura-sig

Laura Rodini
Executive Director, The Mount Vernon Cultural District

The Mount Vernon Cultural District Is
A Proud Partner of Downtown Partnership of Baltimore and Visit Baltimore

A Wide World, ‘Imagined’

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April, 2015     Volume 3, Issue 3

 

Imagined Worlds Priestess
‘High Priestess,’ courtesy Baltimore School for the Arts

 

Dear Reader,

Close your eyes for a moment. Picture the most colorful, far-out landscape: Miles from civilization, and shrouded in myth.

It’s a world you’ve never seen before… and a world you’ve probably never thought was possible, unless it was in your imagination.

Yet students at The Baltimore School for the Arts are making this world a reality.

A new performance, entitled Imagined Worlds, is premiering at the acclaimed arts school this month.

The performance takes inspiration from Codex Seraphinianus, created in the 1980s by Italian architect and artist Luigi Serafini. His masterpiece was an encyclopedia, of sorts, that detailed an unusual fantasy world.

Codex Seraphinianus contained its own hieroglyphic language and page after page of surreal illustrations that challenged one’s mind to its utmost limits. Scholars believe that Serafini wanted to give readers a sensation that was similar to how children feel in front of books they could not yet read.

Mysterious Codex Seraphinianus
A surreal depiction from the Codex Seraphinianus

Composer Marcos Balter, a Guggenheim Fellow, was inspired by Serafini’s encyclopedia to create an operatic score he simply titled Codex. It details the story of a scribe who is in the midst of drawing when his love is kidnapped. He must transition into his own imagination to save her.

Baltimore School for the Arts’ students were tasked to bring Codex to life — and they did so using the cutting-edge technological tools available to them at the BSA’s new Center for Collaborative Arts & Technology.

For instance, with assistance from David Title of Bravo Media, a creative partner for the show, an entire ‘Burning City’ was created using programs like Adobe After Effects and Maxon Cinema 4D. A 3-D video projection will display these spectacular images beside the student dancers on stage at BSA’s Schaefer Ballroom. View a video preview here.

BSA students from every grade level teamed up to bring this production to life. More than 150 visual artists, dancers, musicians, actors and stage production students were involved in all aspects of the performance process, from learning the complicated orchestral score of Codex, to creating a hand-painted alphabet inspired by Serafini’s work, to constructing the sets, props and costumes, and, ultimately, acting in the performance itself.

“Everyone has to mesh to make this production work,” says Director Chris Ford. “Collaboration is one of the key skills employers are looking at today, and one that we hope to help students build while they’re here at BSA. A project like this gives them incredible opportunities to work with each other across disciplines, as well as to work with professionals in their fields.”

Imagined Worlds is directed and choreographed by BSA alum Katherine Helen Fisher (BSA ’97) and features a “Shadow Dance” created with Catapult Entertainment’s Adam Battelstein. Also featured in the performance are four short pieces designed and developed by students.

“Our students have created new virtual spaces,” says Arts Technologist Pat Galluzzo, “They have used cutting-edge multimedia programs to add in effects like fog, post-production. The fact that they know that these programs exist will help them move forward. It presents them with an infinite number of possibilities.”

“At BSA, we provide our students with extraordinary academic and arts training to prepare them for success as creative adults,” said Dr. Chris Ford. “Imagined Worlds brings BSA students in contact with some of the leading young artists of today as well as provides space for them to collaborate and explore current technology in the arts.”

The opportunity for BSA students, faculty and alumni to develop Imagined Worlds has been an exciting one, and they are eager to share it with the Baltimore community — and, since it’s the first time Codex has ever been performed in its entirety, the show will literally be something you’ve never seen before, in Baltimore or elsewhere.

Performances will take place on April 17 at 7:00 p.m. and April 18 at 2:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m. Tickets are $10 for students/seniors and $15 general admission and can be purchased at the BSA’s website: http://www.bsfa.org.

The Baltimore School for the Arts is located at 712 Cathedral Street in Baltimore’s Mount Vernon Neighborhood.


 

Upcoming Events In Mount Vernon
Presented in Chronological Order

 

Baltimore Basilica
409 Cathedral Street | 410-727-3565 | Website

 

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Easter Sunday April 5th
Mass: 8 AM and 10:45 AM
No Evening Mass

 

Center Stage
700 North Calvert Street | 410-332-0033 | Website

 

Herzog Fest

April 1-12, 28-30: 4000 Miles

Set 10 years after After the Revolution, 91-year-old grandmother Vera Joseph takes center stage when, after a tragic loss on a cross-country bike trip, her 21-year-old grandson Leo shows up at her apartment. As a one-night stopover turns into an extended stay, these unlikely roommates frustrate, bewilder, and – eventually – connect with each other. In ways funny, raw, and heart-wrenching, grandmother and grandson find the common identity each needs. Click here to purchase tickets.

April 14-26: After the Revolution

Emma Joseph is young, ambitious, talented, and about to put the ideals of her politically leftist, New York family into action. But a long-buried secret about her much-loved blacklisted grandfather threatens her work and throws her principles – and loyalties – into question. As the family, including grandmother Vera, wrestle with their legacy, Emma must chart her own course forward. Click here to purchase tickets.

HERZOG FREE READINGS:
Mon, Apr 20, 7 pm | FREE!

Featured as part of The Herzog Festival, Amy Herzog’s acclaimed The Great God Pan and Belleville showcase the aftermath of rattling reveals. Then, join us for a related Play Lab workshop of Carey Perloff’s Waiting for the Flood.

The Great God Pan, By Amy Herzog
Mon, Apr 27, 7 pm | FREE!

When a childhood friend steps forward with a disturbing revelation, budding journalist Jamie must dive into the recesses of his memory and reconsider his version of events – and his life. RSVP here.

Belleville, By Amy Herzog
Mon, Apr 27, 7 pm | FREE!

Zack and Abby have escaped the States to start a life together in beautiful Belleville, France – but as deceptions big and small quickly pile up, only one thing seems certain: that nothing is. RSVP here.

 

Enoch Pratt Free Library
400 Cathedral Street | 410-396-5430 | Website

 

Fairy

Fairy Tale Extravaganza Day 1
Saturday, April 11 at 10 AM to 3 PM
Central Library, Central Hall and Children’s Dept

Join us for the two-day kick off of the 13th Annual Fairy Tale Festival: crafts, magic, face painting, and lots of fairy tale fun for the whole family. Dress up like a prince or princess and get your photo taken on our royal throne. At 12:00 p.m. join us for Fractured Fairy Tales with Janice the Griot!

Schedule of Events:

10 AM to 12 PM: Free craft activities, dress-up corner, free royal photos, live magic tricks by Magic Mike, early learning area for children ages birth to five, all in Central Hall

12 PM: Fractured Fairy Tales with Janice the Griot, Wheeler Auditorium

1 PM to 3 PM: Free craft activities, dress-up corner, free royal photos, live magic tricks by Magic Mike, early learning area for children ages birth to five, plus free face painting, all in Central Hall. Click here for complete details

The fun continues on Sunday, April 12 from 1 to 3 PM

Fairy

Fairy Tale Extravaganza Day 2
Sunday, April 12 at 1 PM to 3 PM
Central Library, Central Hall and Children’s Dept

Join us for the two-day kick off of the 13th Annual Fairy Tale Festival: crafts, magic, face painting, and lots of fairy tale fun for the whole family. Dress up like a prince or princess and get your photo taken on our royal throne.

Schedule of Events:

1 PM to 3 PM: Free craft activities, dress-up corner, free royal photos, live magic tricks performed by Magic Mike, free face painting, early learning area for children ages birth to five all in Central Hall.

1 PM: Fairy Tale Ball with live music, dancing, and refreshments in the children’s department. Click here for complete details

 

Maryland Historical Society
201 W. Monument Street | 410-685-3750 | Website

 

Lincoln DC

A Special Tour
‘Abraham Lincoln’s Washington DC’
Saturday, May 16 9 AM to 6 PM

Join The Maryland Historical Society for a bus excursion to Washington DC led by MdHS President Burt Kummerow with stops at Ford’s Theatre, Lincoln’s Cottage at Soldiers’ Home, and the National Museum of Health and Medicine. Lunch is included.

Enjoy a performance by Ford’s Theatre Society of One Destiny, a one-act play that transports visitors back to April 14, 1865, and the events leading up to Lincoln’s assassination.
Visit the Peterson House, the house where Lincoln died across the street from Ford’s Theatre
Experience the Gothic Revival Cottage at the Soldiers’ Home where President Lincoln developed the Emancipation Proclamation
Learn about Civil War era medicine at the National Museum of Health and Medicine and see the temporary exhibition, “His wound is mortal; it is impossible for him to recover” – The Final Hours of President Abraham Lincoln

Tickets: $140 for MdHS Members and $150 for Non-members. Register by calling 410-685-3750 ext. 377 or clicking here.

Bus Departs The Maryland Historical Society promptly at 9:00 AM, please arrive at least 20 minutes early. Parking is available at the Maryland Historical Society.

 

The Maryland Humanities Council
108 West Centre Street | 410-685-0095 | Website

 

The Maryland Humanities Council

Have you ever, after reading a book, wanted to tell the author how his or her words changed your life? Students from across the state will be honored as Maryland finalists on April 25th from 11 AM to 12:15 PM at the Enoch Pratt Free Library for their entries in the 2015 Letters About Literature contest, a signature program of the Center for the Book in the Library of Congress and produced in Maryland by the Maryland Humanities Council. The Christine D. Sarbanes Teacher Award, honoring a Maryland teacher who works to promote reading by employing creative teaching methods, will also be presented during the awards ceremony.

Letters About Literature is a state and national writing contest that encourages young readers in grades 4 to 12 to respond to an author through a letter expressing how that author and book changed their worldview and themselves. Maryland celebrated a National winner in 2015. Jisoo Choi, who was an eighth grade student at Burleigh Manor Middle School in Ellicott City, has been named a National Letters About Literature winner (Level II: 7-8 grades) for her letter to Anne Frank for The Diary of a Young Girl.

The Maryland Humanities Council

The Maryland Humanities Council’s popular monthly Mt. Vernon Literary Walking Tour resumes April 18. Guides traverse the cultural district’s cobblestone streets highlighting the literary luminaries who lived, worked, and visited the historic neighborhood. From Karl Shapiro at the Enoch Pratt Library, to the Gertrude Stein house on Biddle Street, the tour intersects literature with history, architecture and the cultural institutions that call Mt. Vernon home. Peabody Library curator Paul Espinsoa provides a brief hands-on unique look at some of the libraries treasures. The cost is $10 per person for this two-hour tour. Reservations are required. Reserve your tickets online today at www.2015MtVernonLitWalk.eventbrite.com.

Peabody Institute
1 East Mount Vernon Place | 410-234-4500 | Website

 

Peabody Polochick

Peabody Concert Orchestra;
Peabody Singers;
Peabody-Hopkins Chorus
Edward Polochick, Conductor
April 17 at 8 PM

Franz Schubert:
Mass No. 5 in A-flat major, D. 678

Johannes Brahms:
Symphony No. 1 in C minor, Op. 68

The Peabody orchestras close out their season this month with two exhilarating concerts in Peabody’s Miriam A. Friedberg Concert Hall. On Friday, April 17, at 8 PM, conductor Edward Polochick leads the Peabody Concert Orchestra, Peabody Singers, and Peabody-Hopkins Chorus in Brahms’ First Symphony and Franz Schubert’s Mass No. 5 in A-flat major, with soloists Nicole Hodgins, soprano; Rebecca Roy, alto; Joshua Diaz, tenor; and John An, bass. And on Saturday, April 25, at 8:00 pm, Leon Fleisher leads the Peabody Symphony Orchestra in a program featuring Richard Strauss’ Don Juan and Mozart’s Piano Concerto No. 25 in C major with soloist Min Young Park, winner of the Harrison L. Winter Piano Competition.

Tickets: $15 Adults, $10 Seniors, $5 Students. For tickets, please visit the Peabody Box Office website or call 410-234-4800.

 

Spotlighters Theatre
817 St. Paul Street | Phone: 410-752-1225 | Website

 

Cuckoos Nest

One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest
by Dale Wasserman
Greg Bell, director
Mar 27 – Apr 19

Synopsis: McMurphy, a charming rogue who contrives to serve a short sentence in an airy mental institution rather than in a prison, learns he has made a mistake. He clashes with the head nurse, a fierce martinet. He takes over the ward and accomplishes what the medical profession has been unable to do for twelve years – makes a presumed deaf and dumb Indian talk. He leads others out of introversion; stages a revolt so that they can see the world series on television, and arranges a rollicking midnight party with liquor and chippies. For his offense, the head nurse forces him to submit to shock treatment, and eventually she forces him to submit to a final correction – a frontal lobotomy.

Winner of the 2001 Outer Critics Circle Award for Outstanding Revival.
Presented by arrangement with Samuel French, Ltd.

Tickets: Adults $20; Seniors (60+) $18; Students & Military $16.
Ten Spot Thursday – ALL TICKETS JUST $10: Thursday, Apr 2, 2015 at 8 PM (no other discounts apply)

Talk Back with Cast & Director: Sunday, Apr 12, 2015 immediately following the performance.

Performance Dates: Mar 27, 28, 29; Apr 2, 3, 4, 5; Apr 10, 11, 12; Apr 17, 18, 19.

Click here to purchase.

 

The Walters Art Museum
600 N. Charles Street | Phone: 410-547-9000 | Website

 

Rinehart

Rinehart’s Studio: Rough Stone to Living Marble
Sunday, Mar 29, 2015 – Sunday, Aug 30, 2015
10 AM to 5 PM
Location: Centre Street: Level 1: Special Exhibition Gallery

Dive into an exhibition exploring the workshop of 19th century sculptor William Henry Rinehart. Click here for more information.

The Romance of Rome and the Business of Sculpture
Sunday, April 12, 2015, 2 to 3 PM
Location: Graham Auditorium

Listen to curator Jenny Carson as she outlines the way marble sculptures were produced and marketed throughout much of the 19th century. Click here for more information.

Women’s Committee Event:
A Spring Day in Paris Lecture and Luncheon
Friday, April 17, 2015, 10:30 AM to 2 PM
Location: Graham Auditorium and Sculpture Court

Listen and watch as Laura Dowling, chief floral designer at the White House, discusses and demonstrates floral arranging techniques. Seated luncheon follows the discussion. Click here for more information.

Free Spring into Science Family Festival
Saturday, April 18, 2015, 10 AM to 4 PM

Spend the day immersed in the wonders of science and art. No registration required. Click here for more information.


Until next month,

laura-sig

Laura Rodini
Executive Director, The Mount Vernon Cultural District

The Mount Vernon Cultural District Is
A Proud Partner of Downtown Partnership of Baltimore and Visit Baltimore